There are a few rare possible risks and/or complications that can occur post vasectomy. If you are thinking about getting a vasectomy, this article outlines all possible risks and/or complications that can occur from a vasectomy along with the chances of them occurring. As you will see, the chances of these risks and/or complications occurring is minimal.

Most men report a bruised sensation to the scrotum for a few days to a week after the procedure. The soreness and/or swelling should subside after a week after applying the antibiotic ointment and icing the area will help with reducing the soreness and swelling.

Other possible risks and/or complications that can occur are: (the number in the brackets are the chances of the risk and/or complication occurring)

  • Some men experience mild bleeding into the scrotum. (1/100).
  • Scrotal hematoma (1/2000).
    A major bleed into the scrotum could occur, causing a grapefruit size tender scrotum, disabling you for two months.
  • Infection which may require antibiotics (1/100).
    A more serious infection is possible. For example, an abscess formation that may require intravenous antibiotics.
  • Epididymitis (1/50).
    Tender swelling of the epididymis, which is the part of the tube that joins to the testicles. It almost invariably resolves with anti-inflammatories, ice and rest.
  • Sperm granuloma(1/500).
    A painful lump made of leaked sperm that develops at the site where the tube was blocked. It almost invariably resolves with anti-inflammatories, ice and rest.
  • Post vasectomy pain syndrome(1/1000).
    A rare complication of pain in the testicles that can persist for months or years and may be quite debilitating. Some men may never completely recover from this problem or it may resolve on its own or another surgical procedure may be required.
  • Other complications has been reported (1/10,000).
    Some studies have reported a small increase in prostate cancer after vasectomy. Many other studies have shown no increased risk. Most experts agree that vasectomy does not cause cancer.
  • Late failure (1/3000).
    A rare outcome for men who, even successful vasectomy with two semen analyses showing no moving sperm, still manage to impregnate their partner.